#paradise

fuckyesbuffalobills:

iwillbeyourknightinshiningarmor:

carrotbazooka:

"On a snowy night at Ralph Wilson Stadium, the Bills have left one light on in Wilson’s memory."

This just gave me chills.

This one’s for you Ralph

So I finally watched the 100th episode of Glee - because traveling for three consecutive weeks for work is hard,  y’all - and I would just like to say, “Hot damn, I miss Noah Puckerman.”

There are so many versions of Glee2.0 that could have contained him - he & Mercedes’ west coast “trying to make it” story to contrast the NYC one, the one where he moves to NYC & starts a band while working his way through every synagogue in his neighborhood, the one where he & Finn run the Lima University frat, the one where he’s a real and sustainable presence in his brother’s life…  

I just think that if there’s anyone who got what they needed out of being in that choir room, it’s Puck - and watching that development was a joy.  Also, he’s hilarious and super dreamy.  

#sunset BUF>DTW

It occurs to me that I need Deacon Claybourne to cover “Mama Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys.”  

tommyhilfiger:

We can’t wait to show you where we’re taking traditional plaid this season. Who’s up for a little adventure in the Great Outdoors? #TommyFall14 #NYFW

The guy sitting next to me at the Cheesecake Factory bar is talking about how he doesn’t feel like he needs to pay for Internet at his house because he’d never use it. What kind of monster is this? What kind of life does he lead?

.@ofarevolution has the hardest working, best looking horn section in music today! #ofarevolution

instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical. instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical. instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical. instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical. instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical. instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical. instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.



As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical.

instagram:

Local Lens: Going Grey with San Francisco’s @karlthefog

In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. For more photos and videos from the San Francisco fog, follow @karlthefog and fog-photographing friends @lec101, @wesinthewild, @finn, @ravenreviews, @cafeaulei, @luciomx and @moonman415.

As the community of Instagrammers has grown and connected people across the globe, so too has our ability to share some of the personal, hidden and beautiful locations in our hometowns.

In the second of a two-part series of local guides to San Francisco, the city’s very own fog (@karlthefog) shows you the best spots to photograph him.

Below the Fog – Mt. Davidson

"Located near the geographical center of San Francisco and notable for being the highest hill in the city at 925ft (282m), Mt. Davidson is one of my favorite parks. What makes this place so special is the different types of landscapes found within its boundaries: small narrow paths covered by trees that lead up to open fields with panoramic views of the city. (If you’ve ever seen pictures of San Francisco that make you think ‘When did this city turn into a rainforest?’ they were probably taken here.) For the best shots, go on a foggy morning and capture the way the paths disappear in my cloudy presence. On a few lucky days, you’ll reach the top and realize you’re above the clouds, looking down on a sea of cotton candy covering an entire city below.”

Above the Fog – Mt. Tamalpais

"If you’re thinking ‘Mount Davidson is cool, but I wanna go somewhere with an even better view,’ then I have the place for you. One of the Bay Area’s hot spots for photo taking is Mt. Tamalpais. This place has everything: extremely windy roads, dense forests and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, California coast and the entire San Francisco Bay Area. Drive along the Panoramic Highway and stop at every vista you come across. Check the weather report before you go and plan your trip on a foggy day. Time your trip around dusk to watch the sun set over me. You’re welcome.”

In the Fog – Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a giant cape located 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. While many people know it because of the Point Reyes Lighthouse, it’s also the location of vast countryside, farms, lakes, beaches and incredible views. Even the hike to get to the lighthouse is filled with several photo opportunities: steep cliffs, paths covered by trees and staircases that disappear into the horizon. I might be biased, but I recommend going on a foggy day. Bundle up in multiple layers (it’s colder and windier than you think) and capture the way the trees hug the path to the lighthouse. It manages to make an ordinary road look simultaneously daunting and magical.

beachedcoracles:

60° F: Arizonans shiver uncontrollably; people in Buffalo are still sunbathing.

50° F: Californians try to turn on the heat; people in Buffalo plant gardens.

40° F: Italian sports cars won’t start; people in Buffalo drive with the windows down.

32° F: Distilled water…